Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

How do babies feel pain?

What does our research on baby pain look like? Take a peek at our video, recognised with the Digital Media OxTALENT award.

#StartedinOxford

The Paediatric Neuroimaging group are measuring brain activity when babies experience pain #StartedinOxford.

Results of the Poppi trial

The Poppi Trial: Procedural Pain in Premature Infants investigates if morphine is an effective and safe analgesic for premature babies.

What's new

Paediatric Neurorunners for SSNAP take on Oxford Half Marathon

Members of the Paediatric Neuroimaging Research Group at the University of Oxford (based at the Newborn Care Unit) decided to team up to support SSNAP (Support for Sick Newborns And their Parents). The team of four (Simon Marchant, Maz Aspbury, Luke Baxter and Marianne van der Vaart) signed up for the Oxford half marathon on 16th October 2022 to raise money for the charity through sponsorship. A couple of injuries meant that only two crossed the finish line, but they put in enough effort for the whole team!

The development of pain perception in early life

In this interview, Ebony chats with Rebeccah Slater, a professor of Pediatric Neuroimaging in the Department of Pediatrics (Oxford University, UK), about her research on neonatal pain perception and her involvement in FENS 2022. Slater’s lab focuses on how pain perception develops in early life and how this research can better equip doctors to manage and treat pain in babies.

Early life infection increases sensitivity to pain in newborn babies

Researchers from Oxford’s Department of Paediatrics have discovered that infection can increase a baby’s sensitivity to pain, which may last longer than the infection.

Doctors learned how to save premature infants’ lives. They forgot about pain.

Scientists are investigating how to treat pain in babies who can’t tell you when it hurts.