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A summary of a clinical trial investigating the analgesic efficacy and safety of oral morphine in premature infants.

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The development of pain perception in early life

In this interview, Ebony chats with Rebeccah Slater, a professor of Pediatric Neuroimaging in the Department of Pediatrics (Oxford University, UK), about her research on neonatal pain perception and her involvement in FENS 2022. Slater’s lab focuses on how pain perception develops in early life and how this research can better equip doctors to manage and treat pain in babies.

Doctors learned how to save premature infants’ lives. They forgot about pain.

Scientists are investigating how to treat pain in babies who can’t tell you when it hurts.

Why it's so hard to treat pain in infants

For decades physicians believed that premature babies didn’t experience pain. Here’s what doctors know now – and the innovative solutions being embraced by today's caregivers.

Children’s pain ‘swept under the carpet for too long’ – Lancet Commission

The launch of Lancet Child and Adolescent Health Commission - the first ever to address paediatric pain - aims to raise the profile of children’s pain from early years to early adulthood.

New design of ‘bike helmet’ style brain scanner used with children for first time

A new wearable ‘bike helmet’ style brain scanner, that allows natural movement during scanning, has been used in a study with young children for the first time. This marks an important step towards improving our understanding of brain development in childhood.

The power of touch

Deniz Gursul demonstrates that gentle stroking modulates noxious-evoked brain activity in human infants